Why we need a new generation of wood buildings and professionals

  • Why we need a new generation of wood buildings and professionals

  • Mangat Singh

    Organizer
    January 27, 2021 at 1:33 am

    Very good article (full text below)

    Link to original – https://iaac.net/why-we-need-a-new-generation-of-wood-buildings-and-professionals/

    There is a ‘feasible notion to build our future out
    of timber,
    ’ says Rost
    Don Procter November 24, 2020

    Leon Rost was recently a keynote speaker at the Wood Solutions Conference, an annual
    wood design and building event put on recently by Wood WORKS! A partner with BIG (Bjarke Ingels
    Group) Architecture, he is the lead designer for the masterplan of Google offices in California and
    London, England.

    Every month the world constructs the equivalent of all the building stock in New York
    City.
    /
    E
    What might be more surprising is that there is enough logging around the world
    to fulfill that building order with mass timber.

    So said Leon Rost, a keynote speaker at the Wood Solutions Conference, an
    annual wood design and building event put on recently by Wood WORKS! He pointed out
    that 80 per cent of the world’s logged forests end up as biofuel, primarily used in
    developing countries.

    “In terms of long-term vision, if we can move energy to electric, if we can forest (harvest)
    sustainably, it is actually a feasible notion to build our future out of timber,” said Rost,
    who is a partner with BIG (Bjarke Ingels Group) Architecture, an international design firm
    with a number of high-profile global projects to its credit.

    The architect said there isn’t enough timber harvested in the world to “soak up all the
    carbon in the atmosphere.”

    To meet that end, the planet would need to add two times its land mass every year in
    forests.

    To stop carbon emissions and capture carbon in the air, he suggested a solution starts
    with tackling the world’s energy bill – 153,000 terawatt hours, based on a population of
    10 billion – shifting focus to renewable energy sources.

    While there are not enough lakes and rivers around the world for hydro power to take
    the mantle, he pointed out nuclear power is also not the solution partly because the
    emergency exposure zones around nuclear sites require too much land area.

    “Timber is definitely part of the solution, but we should think about how it works
    together with other solutions…how we can design these things in tandem and basically
    create a new vernacular architecture for a sustainable future.”

    At BIG, Rost is the lead designer for the masterplan of Google offices in California and
    London, England, the latter in a dense inner city neighbourhood or Europe’s largest city.

    Calling London Google “a true groundscraper,” he said the complex is about the same
    length as London’s tallest building – the 306-metre-tall Shard – but spread across a
    horizontal plane.

    To create shading on the vast east-west facades of Google London, BIG employed
    vertical louvres made from mass timber. While they serve to cut heat gain, they are also
    mullions holding up triple-height glass panes.

    “This is the largest timber mullion in the world that I know of,” he said.

    He said while mass timber is not the primary structural system of Google London, the
    complex contains 7,000 cubic metres volume of timber.

    That “amounts to almost 2,000 tonnes of carbon extracted from the air.”
    /

    Rost told his audience that the lumber for the London headquarters can be grown in only
    five hours from sustainably forested European sources.

    “By creating a sustainable forest, you actually create more area for forest…adding to the
    (carbon) sequestering potential of trees in this world.”

    While half of the world’s solid waste comes from the construction industry, he said
    smarter technology through robotics and software can help address the issue.

    Robotics can also make inroads into prefabrication, resulting in sweeping changes to
    construction methods as well.

    He pointed to the “Tatami module,” an age-old tradition of modular construction in
    Japan, as one that might be employed today, incorporating the latest technologies, such
    as modern fireproofing, to meet modern codes.

    “The dream is to create modular robotically constructible timber architecture at great
    scale and great efficiency,” for uses ranging from offices to residential.

    Rost said meeting sustainable objectives comes through the recognition of integrated
    solutions to city building where the vernacular “is not defined by esthetics” but in part by
    the building’s performance and its connectivity.

    More resources from the article below (with links).

    Notes
    [1] Global Alliance for Buildings and Construction. 2018 Global Status Report. 2018. Available in this link.
    [2] Architecture 2030. New Buildings: Embodied Carbon. 2020. Available in this link.
    [3] United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Paris Agreement. 2015. Available in this link.
    [4] United Nations. Population. 2019. Available in this link.
    [5] Chadwick D. Oliver, Nedal T. Nassar, Bruce R. Lippke & James B. McCarter. Carbon, Fossil Fuel, and Biodiversity Mitigation With Wood and Forests. Journal of Sustainable Forestry. March 2014, Vol. 33, Pg. 248 – 275. Available in this link.
    [6] Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. The State of the World’s Forests. 2020. Available in this link.
    [7] Suzanne W. Simard, Kevin J. Beiler, Marcus A. Bingham, Julie R. Deslippe, Leanne J. Philip & François P. Teste. Mycorrhizal networks: Mechanisms, ecology and modeling. Fungal Biology Reviews. April 2012, Vol. 26, Issue 1, Pg. 39 – 60. Available in this link.
    [8] Chadwick D. Oliver, Nedal T. Nassar, Bruce R. Lippke & James B. McCarter. Carbon, Fossil Fuel, and Biodiversity Mitigation With Wood and Forests. Journal of Sustainable Forestry. March 2014, Vol. 33, Pg. 248 – 275. Available in this link.
    [9] Think Wood. 2020. Available in this link.
    [10] Graham Lowe. Wood, Well-being and Performance: The Human and Organizational Benefits of Wood Buildings. Forestry Innovation Investment. April, 2020. Available in this link.
    [11] Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia. Master in Mass Timber Design. 2019. Available in this link.

    • This discussion was modified 1 month ago by  Mangat Singh.
    • This discussion was modified 1 month ago by  Mangat Singh.
    • This discussion was modified 1 month ago by  Mangat Singh.

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